Factsheets - Small Animal

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     Atopy in dogs

    Atopy in dogs

    Atopy is a life long skin disease which has to be controlled rather than cured. However, good management can significantly reduce symptoms and dramatically improve the quality of life for your dog. Reaching a correct diagnosis is essential. This may require consulting a veterinary surgeon with extra expertise in skin diseases. Treatment is usually life long and can involve significant commitment in terms of regular visits to your vet, expense, and administration of various treatments. Good control of flare factors such as overgrowth of bacteria and yeasts is a very important aspect of managing this condition.
     Caesarean

    Caesarean surgery on your cat or dog

    Caesarean surgery in the bitch or queen is usually carried out in circumstances where a normal birth is not possible. Particular care of both the mother and the young will be required immediately after surgery so it is important to follow the simple points mentioned in this leaflet. If you have any concerns at all following the caesarean operation speak to a veterinary surgeon or nurse for advice.
    Cancer care

    Cancer care

    The main goal in cancer treatment in animals is to maintain a good quality of life. This can be achieved with early diagnosis and treatments, and by good communication with your vet. • If you are worried about anything or do not understand anything about your pet’s diagnosis and treatment, then please ask the vet or nurse who will be happy to discuss your concerns. • There are many different types of cancer, it is important to get a specific diagnosis so the best form of treatment can be planned for your pet.
     Kidney Failure

    Chronic Renal Disease

    Any animal with chronic renal disease has permanently damaged kidneys. Whilst not all pets will respond to treatment, if we can protect the remaining kidney tissue we can often significantly improve and prolong your pet’s life
    Cranial cruciate rupture

    Cranial cruciate rupture

    • The long term prognosis following cruciate surgery is usually good with most dogs being able to return to a reasonable level of activity. • Knee joint arthritis is unfortunately inevitable, even when surgery has been performed, and this can require long term management in some patients. • Preventing weight gain during the rehabilitation phase and maintaining a lean body condition long term is a key factor in minimising the effects of arthritis.
     Cushing's syndrome

    Cushing's Syndrome

    Cushing’s can in most cases be controlled to allow you and your dog to have a good quality of life. Many dogs can live for several years with the condition. Regular monitoring will be required to ensure that your pet is on the correct dose of medication. A reduction in signs of excessive drinking, urination and appetite usually occur within two weeks of treatment. Skin conditions and hair growth may take up to three to six months for a visible improvement.
    Dental Care

    Dental care for the dog and cat

    It is very important to pay close attention to the health of your pet’s teeth and gums. If dental disease is overlooked or left untreated your pet may experience significant pain and discomfort There are many ways to keep teeth clean. These include tooth brushing, dental diets and mouth washes to name a few. Please ask your practice if you would like to arrange a dental check for your pet, or for any further information on home dental care.
    Diabetes in cats and dogs

    Diabetes in cats and dogs

    The aim of treatment is to control blood glucose levels and restore a good quality of life for both you and your pet. Diabetes can usually be controlled by simple injections, exercise and dietary management Regular monitoring is essential to maintain good control of all diabetic patients If you have any further questions about diabetes please contact one of the vets or nurses at your surgery for more advice
    Dry Eye

    Dry Eye

    • Dry eye is a relatively common condition that can be easily managed by owners at home. • If not detected and treated however, it can cause permanent damage to your pet’s eye and even blindness. • Early detection produces better long-term results. If you suspect your pet may have dry eye then ask your vet.
     Epilepsy

    Epilepsy

    It is rare for epileptic pets to completely stop having fits. With medication the frequency of their fits can be controlled. There is a good chance that they will live a full and happy life.

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